Posts tagged Afghanistan

I came across this fantastic collection of photos by Irish photographer Seamus Murphy in Afghanistan a couple of weeks ago. As we mark the 10th anniversary of the war, I thought this gallery was a good example about how life is continuing amidst the conflict and violence. 
More on Seamus Murphy here and his planned documentary project here.

I came across this fantastic collection of photos by Irish photographer Seamus Murphy in Afghanistan a couple of weeks ago. As we mark the 10th anniversary of the war, I thought this gallery was a good example about how life is continuing amidst the conflict and violence. 

More on Seamus Murphy here and his planned documentary project here.

Murder - the leading cause of death among journalists in warzones

This statement from Article 19 about journalists in conflict zones is a good wrap on the dangers they face there, especially as we mark the 10th anniversary of the Afghan conflict. 

According to the Afghan non-governmental organisation Nai, the 10-year conflict has left 22 journalists dead, 6 of whom were women, and seen 23 journalists kidnapped. Nai’s figures for violence and intimidation against journalists runs into the hundreds.

… But a particularly disturbing trend is the specific targeting of journalists, their abductions or summary executions. Over the past five years, the leading cause of death among journalists in warzones has become murder.

Especially significant is the threat faced by local journalists - just look at the figures of the number of journalists killed in, for example, the Philippines and Mexico.

jeromestarkeyy:

An Afghan ski lift, in Bamyan.

Love this pic!! And here’s the story to go with it: http://www.jeromestarkey.com/post/4334066628/skiing-in-afghanistan-the-donkey-lift-is-great-but-the#disqus_thread

jeromestarkeyy:

An Afghan ski lift, in Bamyan.

Love this pic!! And here’s the story to go with it: http://www.jeromestarkey.com/post/4334066628/skiing-in-afghanistan-the-donkey-lift-is-great-but-the#disqus_thread

'What have we done in 10 years?'

compoundliving:

The attitude of most of the international workers here seems to be one of resignation. They try to do what they can, on an individual level, but are unsure about what exactly they’ve done. What have we done in 10 years here? And though everyone laments the security restrictions that prevent travel to the places where we can actually do some good, no one wants to get killed, either. So we hunker down, make the reports sound good without an effective way to oversee work in the regions, and party like it’s 1999 every Thursday night.

Maybe it’s the overall futility of the situation that makes people turn a blind eye to the corruption and ineffectiveness of their own organizations. Most puzzling, donors don’t seem to care that they’re funding organizations that don’t produce results.

The system just continues, no matter how broken, because no one sees an alternative.

A sad indictment about aid work and its impact on Afghanistan …

drymouth:

“The reality of Afghanistan” right-to-left: Al Qaeda (Pakistan); Gainers (Warlords); Losers (Afghans). via Afghanistan Magazine

A visual way of depicting the winners and losers in Afghanistan. On the topic of the players in Afghanistan, The New York Times put out this handy list of President Hamid Karzai’s family, and who is doing what in Afghanistan. It’s all in the family eh?
I also came across this op-ed today by one of the Afghan Foreign Minister’s senior advisers, Dr Davood Moradian, on the future of his country: Two End States in Afghanistan: Somalia of Asia or the Turkey of the East. (HT @saadmohseni) There’s an interesting comment from a Kabul University student at the end:

"If the world exports us terrorists, we will send them back more committed and ruthless terrorists as well as with dozen kilograms of hashish and opium. But if the world helps us, we will export new generation of Zoroaster, Maulana Jalal Din Balkhi[Rumi], Avicenna, Jamal- din- Afghan, Padshah Khan and juicy Kandahari pomegranates and premium Herati saffron."

And … this has literally just dropped in my inbox, the Australian Defence Force’s fact sheets on Afghanistan, which provides some background on Australia and other countries’ involvement in the country ahead of a parliamentary debate this week.
Update 18.10.10
Some bedtime reading from The New York Review of Books on Afghanistan. Both are by Christopher de Bellaigue - Should Afghanistan Exist? and The War with the Taliban.

drymouth:

“The reality of Afghanistan” right-to-left: Al Qaeda (Pakistan); Gainers (Warlords); Losers (Afghans). 
via Afghanistan Magazine

A visual way of depicting the winners and losers in Afghanistan. On the topic of the players in Afghanistan, The New York Times put out this handy list of President Hamid Karzai’s family, and who is doing what in Afghanistan. It’s all in the family eh?

I also came across this op-ed today by one of the Afghan Foreign Minister’s senior advisers, Dr Davood Moradian, on the future of his country: Two End States in Afghanistan: Somalia of Asia or the Turkey of the East. (HT @saadmohseni) There’s an interesting comment from a Kabul University student at the end:

"If the world exports us terrorists, we will send them back more committed and ruthless terrorists as well as with dozen kilograms of hashish and opium. But if the world helps us, we will export new generation of Zoroaster, Maulana Jalal Din Balkhi[Rumi], Avicenna, Jamal- din- Afghan, Padshah Khan and juicy Kandahari pomegranates and premium Herati saffron."

And … this has literally just dropped in my inbox, the Australian Defence Force’s fact sheets on Afghanistan, which provides some background on Australia and other countries’ involvement in the country ahead of a parliamentary debate this week.

Update 18.10.10

Some bedtime reading from The New York Review of Books on Afghanistan. Both are by Christopher de Bellaigue - Should Afghanistan Exist? and The War with the Taliban.

Dry Mouth - Kabul Life: Loss of another good person

I felt I should reblog this. It’s a moving tribute by a friend of one of the doctors - Dr Karen Woo - who was shot dead in northern Afghanistan with nine others on Friday.

My mate Karen was killed on Thursday. We weren’t very close and there are many who are much more devastated than me: her boyfriend, her family, her colleagues and friends, but I wanted to pay a small tribute.

Karen was very pretty, very funny, extremely intelligent and had a fervour for helping…

Read the full post here. Read Dr Woo’s personal blog about her experiences in Afghanistan here.

Great to see The Guardian placing a long-form video in its front-page image slot.

It’s not often that you get to see an in-depth piece on the front-page of news websites, as many are more focused on quick-turnover, here-today-gone-tomorrow stories.

Just a shout-out to an amazing gallery of portrait photos of Afghan National Army soldiers by Associated Press (AP) photographer Kevin Frayer. We often see stories and photos of American, British and Australian soldiers in action in Afghanistan, but rarely of their Afghan colleagues.
More of Frayer’s excellent work here.

Just a shout-out to an amazing gallery of portrait photos of Afghan National Army soldiers by Associated Press (AP) photographer Kevin Frayer. We often see stories and photos of American, British and Australian soldiers in action in Afghanistan, but rarely of their Afghan colleagues.

More of Frayer’s excellent work here.

Asylum seekers: the facts

90% of asylum seekers win refugee status
Glenda Kwek
April 22, 2009

More than 90 per cent of the “queue jumping” asylum seekers who risk their lives to get to Australia illegally by boat later win refugee status, a refugee advocacy group says.

A new debate about boat people has been triggered by the deadly explosion on an Afghan asylum seekers’ boat off Ashmore Reef last Thursday.

But Pamela Curr of the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre said most people who arrived here by boat eventually succeeded in their applications for refugee status, while the increase in numbers reflects the global growth in the number of asylum applicants. MORE