Posts tagged journalism

“Big data” has arrived, but big insights have not. The challenge now is to solve new problems and gain new answers – without making the same old statistical mistakes on a grander scale than ever.
a good read in the Financial Times ($) on how we need to be cautious about big data and its pitfalls even as we try to maximise its benefits. by @TimHarford
Use adjectives to make your meaning more precise and be cautious of those you find yourself using to make it more emphatic.
via @econstyleguide (great writing tip)
Interactives may be all the rage nowadays, but there’s nothing like good, clear infographics in print or online to explain what can be a complicated story. In particular, the current Ukraine, Crimea crisis is a great example of how maps and other related information can truly enhance the understanding of what’s at stake and why.
Here’s three great examples from @FT, @guardian (pictured and links back to this page: http://www.theguardian.com/world/graphic/2014/mar/03/russia-ukraine-military-imbalance-graphic) and @AFP:

Russia and #Ukraine: the military imbalance http://t.co/hm7UaGz5HD pic.twitter.com/cZ2bQcOaFy
— The Guardian (@guardian) March 3, 2014



FT graphic shows the large resources required if Russia wanted a war with Ukraine: http://t.co/G1swDVK6Vg pic.twitter.com/gaiYVWlOlW
— Joseph Stashko (@JosephStash) March 3, 2014



INFOGRAPHIC: Chronology of the latest events in Ukraine pic.twitter.com/eBtARGvNi8
— Agence France-Presse (@AFP) March 2, 2014

Interactives may be all the rage nowadays, but there’s nothing like good, clear infographics in print or online to explain what can be a complicated story. In particular, the current Ukraine, Crimea crisis is a great example of how maps and other related information can truly enhance the understanding of what’s at stake and why.

Here’s three great examples from @FT, @guardian (pictured and links back to this page: http://www.theguardian.com/world/graphic/2014/mar/03/russia-ukraine-military-imbalance-graphic) and @AFP:

Making Sense of Data - Course

Can’t get enough of data? Here’s what looks to be a good course by Google, coming up in March, that will help you grapple with fusion tables (ekk) and find relationships in data (yey). (via @sambrook)

Invisible Child: Dasani'€™s Homeless Life

One of the joys of the festive season is the opportunity to spend some time catching up on reading. And I have to say the excellent reporting by Andrea Elliott in The New York Times on the plight of homeless children in New York was worth every minute.

It’s lengthy, detailed and uncompromising. It’s one of the best examples I saw in 2013 of strong local reporting and also of investigative work - telling the story of a side of New York that few know (or want to know). It reminds me of how a fantastic reporter like Elliott and the opportunity to pursue and publish such stories (NYT) can combine to create great journalism that can also hopefully lead to policy changes.

I’m always excited about “news games” - online games built by journalists and programs to help illustrate the issues raised in a story. So it was good to read an interview with Fred di Giacomo, a Brazilian magazine editor on what topics are ideal for “news games”, how such games are developed and how successful such games are.
And if you want to try out a fun - and fairly instructive - news games, have a go at this excellent New York Times interactive on texting and gaming.

I’m always excited about “news games” - online games built by journalists and programs to help illustrate the issues raised in a story. So it was good to read an interview with Fred di Giacomo, a Brazilian magazine editor on what topics are ideal for “news games”, how such games are developed and how successful such games are.

And if you want to try out a fun - and fairly instructive - news games, have a go at this excellent New York Times interactive on texting and gaming.

The Economist explains

Am a big fan of backgrounders and Q&As, as I’ve posted elsewhere on this blog. This Economist section answers one question each day, and you can send in you queries too. Excellent stuff and I hope more news websites do this.

It’s not just what you print that makes you an authoritative and trusted source for news, but what you don’t print.
Unnamed Reuters reporter mentioned in this Guardian piece: http://m.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/mar/29/cyberwar-spun-shoddy-journalism

Always ask questions

One of the fun things about journalism (to me) is the opportunity of find out more about why or how something happens. While Google has been performing this function well most of the time, I often enjoy reading a good, well-written and well-edited backgrounder on an issue that is currently in the news.

The BBC News’ “Who, What, Why” is one such series. After rebels seized the city of Timbuktu in Mali, this article “Who, What, Why: Why do we know Timbuktu?" served as a good backgrounder on how the place Timbuktu came to represent a place far, far away in the English language.

Then there was a story about a cat that survived a 19-floor fall in the US. The question became: “Who, What, Why: How do cats survive falls from great heights?”. Some people might say such a topic is frivolous, but I say, never stop asking questions!

I came across this fantastic collection of photos by Irish photographer Seamus Murphy in Afghanistan a couple of weeks ago. As we mark the 10th anniversary of the war, I thought this gallery was a good example about how life is continuing amidst the conflict and violence. 
More on Seamus Murphy here and his planned documentary project here.

I came across this fantastic collection of photos by Irish photographer Seamus Murphy in Afghanistan a couple of weeks ago. As we mark the 10th anniversary of the war, I thought this gallery was a good example about how life is continuing amidst the conflict and violence. 

More on Seamus Murphy here and his planned documentary project here.