Posts tagged photography

This series of photographs by Huang Qingjun is just brilliant. They depict all the worldly possessions that families in rural China have. Many have very little — a stark contrast to their fellow citizens in the affluent eastern coastal cities. Yet at the same time, many, such as the Inner Mongolian family shown above, also have a fair range of digital gadgets, from satellite dishes to other appliances. 
You can view more of the photograhs here, and also read a good interview with Huang, plus more pics, here.

This series of photographs by Huang Qingjun is just brilliant. They depict all the worldly possessions that families in rural China have. Many have very little — a stark contrast to their fellow citizens in the affluent eastern coastal cities. Yet at the same time, many, such as the Inner Mongolian family shown above, also have a fair range of digital gadgets, from satellite dishes to other appliances. 

You can view more of the photograhs here, and also read a good interview with Huang, plus more pics, here.

I liked this description by photographer Dominic Nahr (Magnum and Time magazine) of the difficult — and sometimes positive — conditions he experienced working in South Sudan as he covered the conflict over Heglig. He writes vividly about some of the challenges he faced:

A dreadlocked rebel soldier from Darfur–which lies far across the border in Sudan–became angry that I and a companion had taken his photo and chased us down in his Mad Max car, jumping out and cocking his gun with such fury I thought it was going to fly right out of his hands. He then sped off with two cameras.

It’s a brief but good insight into the often exacting conditions that photographers in war zones work under. Yet all of them, like Dominic Nahr, produce amazing images that capture the spirit, and struggles, of the people caught up on conflict. You can read more of Nahr’s comments and view his photos here. 

I liked this description by photographer Dominic Nahr (Magnum and Time magazine) of the difficult — and sometimes positive — conditions he experienced working in South Sudan as he covered the conflict over Heglig. He writes vividly about some of the challenges he faced:

A dreadlocked rebel soldier from Darfur–which lies far across the border in Sudan–became angry that I and a companion had taken his photo and chased us down in his Mad Max car, jumping out and cocking his gun with such fury I thought it was going to fly right out of his hands. He then sped off with two cameras.

It’s a brief but good insight into the often exacting conditions that photographers in war zones work under. Yet all of them, like Dominic Nahr, produce amazing images that capture the spirit, and struggles, of the people caught up on conflict. You can read more of Nahr’s comments and view his photos here

I came across this fantastic collection of photos by Irish photographer Seamus Murphy in Afghanistan a couple of weeks ago. As we mark the 10th anniversary of the war, I thought this gallery was a good example about how life is continuing amidst the conflict and violence. 
More on Seamus Murphy here and his planned documentary project here.

I came across this fantastic collection of photos by Irish photographer Seamus Murphy in Afghanistan a couple of weeks ago. As we mark the 10th anniversary of the war, I thought this gallery was a good example about how life is continuing amidst the conflict and violence. 

More on Seamus Murphy here and his planned documentary project here.

tonsofland:

 
“Watch, listen, shoot every day, not everyday, look at the best work obsessively, give yourself time, realize you just ain’t got it when comparing your work to the very best, don’t get cynical, reinvestigate hallucinogens to expand your thinking (optional), take more photos (not optional), browse your archive and cringe, and (hopefully) smile that at least you’re not that bad anymore, thank god you didn’t submit any of those to HCSP, ponder what you’ll think of your current work in 12 months, see previous, rethink yourself 20 times before starting a thread on HCSP, kill your television, worship your gods then kill them, with reverence, get off your computer and go outside, take more photos, use less equipment, screw on your balls of steel, treat yourself to a cool bag that doesn’t look like a camera bag (as much), shoot some chromes on a 40-year-old rangefinder, look at some of the best 40-year-old photos taken on a rangefinder, smack your head and say holy fuck they were good, take pictures, make glorious failures, take pictures, loosen the fuck up, buy an ipod and listen to Tom Waits (vintage) while on the street, and realize that good street photography is fucking Everest so lighten up, give yourself a break, celebrate good work, learn, learn, learn, shoot, shoot, shoot and most importantly, get the fuck out the door.
At least that’s what I tell myself, and I have to commute.
Oh yeah, and smile. Always smile.”
words of advice #1.  tom hyde.

tonsofland:

“Watch, listen, shoot every day, not everyday, look at the best work obsessively, give yourself time, realize you just ain’t got it when comparing your work to the very best, don’t get cynical, reinvestigate hallucinogens to expand your thinking (optional), take more photos (not optional), browse your archive and cringe, and (hopefully) smile that at least you’re not that bad anymore, thank god you didn’t submit any of those to HCSP, ponder what you’ll think of your current work in 12 months, see previous, rethink yourself 20 times before starting a thread on HCSP, kill your television, worship your gods then kill them, with reverence, get off your computer and go outside, take more photos, use less equipment, screw on your balls of steel, treat yourself to a cool bag that doesn’t look like a camera bag (as much), shoot some chromes on a 40-year-old rangefinder, look at some of the best 40-year-old photos taken on a rangefinder, smack your head and say holy fuck they were good, take pictures, make glorious failures, take pictures, loosen the fuck up, buy an ipod and listen to Tom Waits (vintage) while on the street, and realize that good street photography is fucking Everest so lighten up, give yourself a break, celebrate good work, learn, learn, learn, shoot, shoot, shoot and most importantly, get the fuck out the door.

At least that’s what I tell myself, and I have to commute.

Oh yeah, and smile. Always smile.”

words of advice #1.  tom hyde.

I’ve started a photo blog on another tumblr page. It’s basically a way to share some of my favourite photos - mostly taken while I’m travelling.

I’m still very much an amateur when it comes to photography, so hopefully the photo-taking will improve as I go along.

Enjoy.

A really powerful image on today’s front-page of The Washington Post. There are though, as always, questions about the use of photos of children in strife from developing countries. Would we use such images of children in our newspapers? Do we apply a different standard for Western children? You can read a little more about this debate in this AlertNet feature (scroll down to Ethics, Pictures and the Media). 
frontpages:
Pakistani floods could further hurt unstable nation as military focuses on aid

A really powerful image on today’s front-page of The Washington Post. There are though, as always, questions about the use of photos of children in strife from developing countries. Would we use such images of children in our newspapers? Do we apply a different standard for Western children? You can read a little more about this debate in this AlertNet feature (scroll down to Ethics, Pictures and the Media). 

frontpages:

  1. Pakistani floods could further hurt unstable nation as military focuses on aid
I came across these stunning photos through @rocketboom. They are of the longest photographic exposures in history. This one above is of the Museum of Modern Art in New York and was taken by German photographer Michael Wesely.
He used a self-built pinhole camera and left the hole open for up to 34 months. Enjoy the results here.

I came across these stunning photos through @rocketboom. They are of the longest photographic exposures in history. This one above is of the Museum of Modern Art in New York and was taken by German photographer Michael Wesely.

He used a self-built pinhole camera and left the hole open for up to 34 months. Enjoy the results here.

Just a shout-out to an amazing gallery of portrait photos of Afghan National Army soldiers by Associated Press (AP) photographer Kevin Frayer. We often see stories and photos of American, British and Australian soldiers in action in Afghanistan, but rarely of their Afghan colleagues.
More of Frayer’s excellent work here.

Just a shout-out to an amazing gallery of portrait photos of Afghan National Army soldiers by Associated Press (AP) photographer Kevin Frayer. We often see stories and photos of American, British and Australian soldiers in action in Afghanistan, but rarely of their Afghan colleagues.

More of Frayer’s excellent work here.